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ISSAQUAH LAW GROUP

Issaquah Law Group: Experienced Counsel; Client Focus

PHILOSOPHY: Formed in 2014, Issaquah Law Group is a law firm with one focus: providing businesses and insurers with high quality legal representation with the responsiveness of a smaller firm. ILG was founded on the principle that strong client relationships are the key to successful legal representation and strong relationships are built upon clear and consistent communication. 

LITIGATION: We work closely with our clients to fully and accurately understand their goals, work collaboratively to formulate specific legal strategies, and execute the agreed plan of action utilizing methods most likely to result in the efficient and effective resolution of the matter. ILG attorneys have a broad base of litigation experience to draw on in all Federal and State courts from on-the-ground investigations to Supreme Court appeals in the areas of personal injury and wrongful death, product liability, commercial general liability, labor & employment, construction litigation, and catastrophic losses due to fire and explosion.

BUSINESS LAW: Rarely is the path from point A to point B a straight line, so our role in a business law practice is to find alternatives, devise workable strategies, and keep your business ideas, goals and objectives moving toward realization. ILG’s business attorneys help clients achieve their goals with respect to business formation, intellectual property, labor and employment, CAN-SPAM, copyright and trademark

COMMUNITY: In addition, the Lawyers at Issaquah Law Group remain active in the legal and civic community. A core commitment of our Issaquah Attorneys is community service. Our attorneys' civic involvement includes the King County Civil Rights Commission; the City of Issaquah Planning Policy Commission; the Northwest Screenwriters Guild, service as a pro tem judge. We live and work in the Pacific Northwest, and we aim to make it a better place.

In addition, through The Amateur Law Professor Blog and LinkedIn postings, we share pertinent opinions and decisions of the Washington State Supreme Court, as well as the pertinent opinions and decisions of the Washington State Courts of Appeal so that our clients can be as update to date on cutting legal issues as we are.

WA Legal Roundup: WA Supreme Court: Mom loses 4 years olds left at home for work; ANOTHER Blakely case; Can't Adversely Possess City's Alley

So its actually quite an interesting day.

The first case wasn't all that surprising. The challenge to the dependency action was based on not providing services blah blah blah. The usual rigamarole in dependency actions. So naturally, in Dependency of M.S.R. the Court found no issue with the services (not always the case) and no issue with failure of providing counsel, since none was requested. Let's just say its not a good idea to take off for work and leave your twin four year olds to their own devices. In this case, they ended up causing a fire.

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Next case is a Blakely case. Every public defender should know this and the Recuenco series of decisions. Anyhow, the long and the short of it is Recuenco III isn't retroactive and the Court may look at verdict forms to determine if the sentence is valid on its face. Can you imagine the train hurtling down the tracks if firearms enhancements from time immemorial were invalidated? Further, the court should be able to quickly look and see if the sentence is valid on its face, which would give it the ability to revise and clear the burden of the COA. The true gem of this opinion comes from Chambers' clerk's inserted footnote. Those who know Chambers' clerks know from whence this note sprang:

On June 24, 2004, five black-clad figures seized control of the Criminal Justice Express, crashed through warning barriers, flattened the Washington State Sentencing Guidelines, opened the throttle, and sent the train hurtling from the main line down the old rail spur where the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and the sentencing systems of numerous states lay tied helplessly to the tracks. Whereupon, the 2003 Term of Court being concluded, the justices twirled their collective mustachios, sent their robes off to the cleaners, and went on vacation. Two months on, as this Essay goes to press, the rest of us stand staring slack-jawed, some delighted and some aghast, at the disarray and paralysis in the locomotive's wake and the impending carnage at the end of the line.

I refer, of course, to Blakely v. Washington.

Now, to preserve the (semi) anonymity of the Clerks, I won't give the name. But I will tell you that this quote originated in a law review article: Frank O. Bowman, III, Essay, Train Wreck  Or Can the Federal Sentencing System Be Saved  A Plea for Rapid Reversal of Blakely v. Washington, 41 Am. Crim. L. Rev. 217, 218 (2004). Oh yeah, the opinion is PRP of Scott.

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Its important to note that, while there have been a LOT of post-Blakely cases. I don't think the sky has fallen down. The courts seem to have dealt with it rather effectively. Probably a little less turmoil than the whole felon-murder thing and the seminal case I can't remember right now.

Finally, you can't really take a city's alleyway. Its there for public use, so you're not really adverse possessing until the state actually says that part of it isn't yours. This only applies to statutory dedications as opposed to common law dedications, which CAN be adversely possessed (comes down to the difference between a grant of fee simple in a statutory dedication of land, and an easement in common law). Sadly, I do not have anything funny to say about an Alley. So instead, I'll post something involving Kirstie Alley. Oh yeah, so you want to know the case on this one too? You needy bastards! Fine! Kiely v. Graves.

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